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Wednesday, August 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Political leadership in Zapatista Mexico found in the catalog.

Political leadership in Zapatista Mexico

Daniela di Piramo

Political leadership in Zapatista Mexico

Marcos, celebrity, and charismatic authority

by Daniela di Piramo

  • 398 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by FirstForumPress in Boulder, Colo .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementDaniela di Piramo
Classifications
LC ClassificationsF1256 .D55 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24494285M
ISBN 109781935049210
LC Control Number2010018975
OCLC/WorldCa551146212

  The form that feminism took in the context of the Zapatista movement was a combination of the early Zapatista leaders having a clear commitment to . Neozapatismo or neozapatism (sometimes mislabelled as zapatismo) is the political philosophy and practice devised and employed by Mexico's Zapatista Army of National Liberation (a.k.a. the neozapatistas or zapatistas), who govern a large territory in Chiapas and have done so since the beginning of the Chiapas lly, it is not an ideology, as the Zapatistas' The Clandestine.

Political Leadership in Zapatista Mexico: Marcos, Celebrity, and Charismatic Authority. By Daniela Di Piramo. Abstract. Can charismatic authority be used to further progressive politics without simultaneously doing damage? Is it possible for a movement with a charismatic leader to achieve an egalitarian society? Tracing the history of Mexico's. Since the startling emergence of an armed insurgency in southern Mexico in January of , much ink has been spilled attempting to explain the roots of this rebellion, the implications of its emergence during a time of slow democratization and rapid economic modernization, and the likelihood that such a movement could emerge in a similar context.

Although May doesn't discuss the Zapatistas -- the Zapatista uprising having taken place the same year as the publication of The Political Philosophy of Poststructuralist Anarchism-- a subsequent book (Gilles Deleuze, ) uses the example of the Palestinian liberation movement to make a case similar to Nail's.   After two decades of declining to engage with electoral politics in Mexico, the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) and the National Indigenous Congress of Mexico (CNI) have announced their plans to form a national Indigenous governing council and choose and support an Indigenous woman candidate in the Mexican presidential elections.. For many longtime .


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Political leadership in Zapatista Mexico by Daniela di Piramo Download PDF EPUB FB2

A unique exploration of the tension between the personalistic and the transformative dimensions of charismatic authority. This timely, illuminating book is indispensable to the study of the Zapatista Movement and its charismatic spokesman, Subcomandante Marcos --Priscilla Falcon, University of Northern ColoradoCited by: 3.

Books (in English) specifically on Marcos. Nick Henck, Subcommander Marcos: the Man and the Mask (Durham, NC, ) Daniela Di Piramo, Political Leadership in Zapatista Mexico: Marcos, Celebrity, and Charismatic Authority (Boulder, CO, )Education: Instituto Cultural Tampico.

Get this from a library. Political leadership in Zapatista Mexico: Marcos, celebrity, and charismatic authority. [Daniela di Piramo] -- Can charismatic authority be used to further progressive politics without simultaneously doing damage.

Is it possible for a movement with a charismatic leader to achieve an egalitarian society?. Political Leadership in Zapatista Mexico by Daniela Di Piramo,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. was the leader of the Zapatista National Liberation Army (Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional; EZLN, also called the Zapatistas), which launched a rebellion in in the state of Chiapas and later functioned as a political movement defending the rights of Mexico’s indigenous peoples.

Marcos’s leadership of the EZLN made. Tracing the history Political leadership in Zapatista Mexico book Mexico's Zapatista movement and the emergence of its controversial masked spokesman, Subcommandante Marcos, Daniela di Piramo investigates the implications of these questions.

Di Piramo's important distinction between charisma as an individual attribute and charismatic authority as a form of political power is reflected. The book includes a recent interview with Marcos and speeches made by Zapatista comandantes, as well as the Zapatistas' "Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle, "B which places the indigenous struggle for democracy in its historical context and articulates an.

Through an exploration of the Zapatista movement's origins, history, structure, aims, political philosophy and practice, and future directions this book provides a critical, comprehensive, and accessible overview of one of the most important rebel groups in recent history.

The Zapatistas, also known as the EZLN, are a political movement made up of indigenous activists from the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. The EZLN led an uprising on January 1, to address the Mexican government's indifference. J anuary 1, marked 25 years since the Zapatistas captured the world’s imagination with their brief but audacious uprising to demand justice and democracy for Indigenous peasants in southern Mexico.

While never formally laying down its weapons, the Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (Zapatista Army of National Liberation, EZLN) has since become known more for its.

This collection on the Zapatista uprising brings together contributors from Mexico, the United States and Britain. The editors examine the formation of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) and discuss the key themes of the uprising - from the central issue of what it means to have a revolution that does not aim to take power to the meaning of identity and non-identity, the question.

The Zapatista uprising started in Januaryand lasted less than two weeks before a ceasefire was agreed upon. The principal belligerents of subsection of the conflict were the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (Spanish: Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional; EZLN) and the government of Mexico.

Negotiations between the government and Zapatistas led to agreements being signed, but. The fieldwork experiences and interviews in Land and Freedom aim to provide a unique view of the internal dynamics of revolutionary movements in Brazil and s interested in learning about these social dynamics and understanding how movements work will certainly benefit from this text, writes Francesco Di Bernardo.

Details of the International Conference on Democracy and. The Zapatista Army of National Liberation (Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional, EZLN), often referred to as the Zapatistas [sapaˈtistas], is a far-left libertarian-socialist political and militant group that controls a substantial amount of territory in Chiapas, the southernmost state of Mexico.

As the first attempt to abolish police are under way in the US, meet the communities that have been experimenting with self-organisation, such as Zapatistas in ñol.

The Zapatista movement has always been at odds with Lopez Obrador. Since the first time he ran for president inthe EZLN organized an alternative campaign and declared its opposition to the leftist candidate. Now, with its landslide victory in the elections, the Zapatistas have reiterated their position.

Compañeras is the untold story of women’s involvement in the Zapatista movement, the indigenous rebellion that has inspired grassroots activists around the world for over two decades.

Gathered here are the stories of grandmothers, mothers, and daughters who became guerrilla insurgents and political leaders, educators and healers—who worked collectively to construct a new society of. Guerrilla insurgents. Political leaders.

Promoters of health and education. Members of economic cooperatives. These are just some of the prominent, everyday roles held by women in the Zapatista autonomous region in Chiapas, where women’s participation has proved indispensable to the creation and maintenance of an alternative, democratic society/5(10).

Mexico’s Zapatista movement exemplifies a new approach to social conflict that we callsocialthe nation that gave the world a prototype of social revolution early in the 20th century, has generated an information-age prototype of militant social netwar on the eve of the 21st century.

In response to Mexico’s election of Andrés Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO), the Zapatista Army for National Liberation (EZLN) has announced a new era in its now year long “war against oblivion.”The Autonomy Solidarity organization explains that the Zapatista are “At great risk” now that the Mexican state is under the leadership of AMLO, who is preparing “To unleash a series of.

Hilary Klein lived in Chiapas, Mexico, for several years, where she worked with women’s projects in Zapatista communities.

After she edited a book of Zapatista women’s testimonies to be circulated in their own villages, women in the Zapatista leadership suggested that she compile a similar book for an outside audience.Political Leadership in Zapatista Mexico: Marcos, Celebrity, and Charismatic Authority ‐ by Di Piramo, Daniela.

Maarten van Delden. University of California, Los Angeles. Search for more papers by this author. Maarten van Delden. University of California, Los Angeles.HILARY KLEIN spent six years in Chiapas, Mexico, working with women’s projects in Zapatista communities.

After she compiled a book of Zapatista women’s testimony to be circulated in their own villages, women in the Zapatista leadership suggested that Hilary compile a similar book .